Actor

Gene Kelly Phone Number, Email, Fan Mail, Address, Biography, Agent, Manager, Publicist, Contact Info

If you want to know about Gene Kelly real phone number and also look for Gene Kelly email and fanmail address then, you are at the correct place! We are going to give you the contact information of Gene Kelly like his phone number, email address, and Fanmail address details.

Gene Kelly Contact Details:

REAL NAME: Gene Kelly
NICKNAME: Gene Kelly
DOB: 23 August 1912, East Liberty, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
BIRTHPLACE: East Liberty, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
NATIONALITY: American
BIRTH SIGN: Taurus
PROFESSION: Actor
FATHER: Not Known
MOTHER: Not Known
SIBLINGS: NA
SPOUSE / WIFE: NA
CHILDREN: NA
INSTAGRAM HANDLE: https://www.instagram.com/legendarygenekelly/?hl=en
TWITTER HANDLE: https://twitter.com/GeneKellyLegacy
FACEBOOK HANDLE: https://www.facebook.com/public/Gene-Kelly


Gene Kelly Bio

Third son of Harriet Catherine (Curran) and James Patrick Joseph Kelly, a phonograph salesman, Eugene Curran Kelly was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In addition to his father’s Irish ancestry, his mother’s Irish and German ancestry made him a unique individual.

When Gene Kelly came in Hollywood in 1941, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer was the largest and most powerful studio. After completing the one film required by his contract, he intended to return to the popular 1940 Broadway play of “Pal Joey.” In 1942, he directed Judy Garland in For Me and My Gal for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. The “kindred creative energies” he encountered behind the scenes at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer were what kept Kelly in Hollywood. During World War II, Hollywood became a haven for thousands of European artists and performers who were forced to flee the Nazis.

During the post-war years, a new generation was born. An American in Paris (1951) inspired a generation of moviegoers to try to live their lives as romantically as the show’s characters did, and for those who saw the musical for the first time, it was like reliving the 17-minute ballet sequence set to the show’s title song, choreographed by George Gershwin and performed by Kelly. In 1951, the production of this sequence would have cost half a million dollars (U.S.). One of the first 25 films in the Library of Congress’s National Film Registry was another Kelly musical, Singin’ in the Rain (1952). Unlike Fred Astaire, Kelly did not wear a top hat and tails but instead wore work clothing that complemented his muscular, physical style of dancing.


Gene Kelly died at the age of 83 on February 2, 1996, in Beverly Hills, California, due to complications from two strokes. A World War II Sailor, he was stationed at the United States Naval Photography Center in Anacostia, DC (where Victory at Sea (1952) was later assembled for television by the National Broadcasting Corporation). In the Navy, he appeared in multiple films, while on leave, in “civilian” films.

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania’s East Liberty neighborhood. In Empire (UK) magazine’s “The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time” list published in October 1997, he was placed #26. In 1992, he was honored with a place in the Theater Hall of Fame. Kelly’s father worked as Al Jolson’s road manager in the ’20s. Kelly’s father was a famous actor of the day.

Three children: Kerry Kelly in 1942, Bridget Kelly and Tim Kelly in the 1960s with Jeanne Coyne, and Tim Kelly in the 1980s with Betsy Blair. “Girlie Show” tour in 1993. Dance consultant. Prior to going to the University of Pittsburgh, he studied at Penn State University.

Gene Kelly Phone Number

Dancers were the first two women he married. He was a choreographer in the show “Diamond Horseshoe” when he first met Betsy Blair. Prior to her marriage to Gene in 1960, Gene’s second wife, Jeanne Coyne, worked as his dance assistant for many years. With Bobby Van, Ann Miller, Tommy Rall, Carol Haney, and Bob Fosse, she performs “From This Moment On” in Kiss Me Kate (1953), proving she is a major talent in her own right (1953). In 1973, she succumbed to leukemia.

In a dancing vaudeville performance, he and his younger brother Fred Kelly performed together as a brother and sister duo. Gene was later replaced by his brother Fred, who took “The Time of Your Life” on the road and earned a Donaldson Award for his performance, as Harry the hoofer, in the dramatic Broadway staging in 1939. Had a fever of 103 degrees during the production of Singin’ in the Rain’s famous rain sequence (1952).

After seeing Kelly on Broadway in “Pal Joey,” producer David O. Selznick signed him to his first Hollywood contract. Gene chose to sign with Selznick over other studios since Selznick was the only one that didn’t require screening before signing him. Before Selznick could locate a fitting role for Kelly, he sold his contract to MGM.

His long-standing conflict with MGM studio chief Louis B. Mayer began even before Kelly entered the film industry.. Mayer met Gene backstage after seeing him appear in “Pal Joey” on Broadway and offered him a contract with MGM without a screen test afterward. When Kelly later received a call from an MGM representative seeking a screen test, he argued there was some sort of mistake, saying he had Mayer’s word he did not have to make one and instructed the rep to ask Mayer himself. He called back a few days later to say that he had spoken to Mayer and that he still needed to take the test. After Mayer reneged on his pledge, Kelly issued a blistering letter to the CEO. Kelly didn’t know for a while that Mayer had even read the letter until he brought it up in an argument one night.


Cyd Charisse’s husband Tony Martin claimed he knew who she had been dancing with on an MGM set that day. If she had bruises all over her body, it was either Gene Kelly or Fred Astaire, both of whom are very demanding. As Don Hewes in the Easter Parade, he was originally slated to star with Judy Garland (1948). As a result of Fred Astaire’s decision to come out of retirement to replace him, the filming was halted.

The early 1970s saw Bob Fosse considering him for the main part in a film adaptation of the play “Chicago” by Maurine Dallas Watkins. To Fosse’s relief, he eventually decided to go the stage musical route instead. During the song “Take Away My Pain” from Dream Theater’s album “Falling into Infinity” published in 1997, the lyric “he said look at poor Gene Kelly, I guess he won’t be singing in the rain” is mentioned.

MGM loaned Kelly’s to Columbia in order to gain the film rights to the successful musical “Best Foot Forward.” Even though it was widely expected that Columbia would produce a film adaptation of Kelly’s stage hit “Pal Joey,” the company co-starred him with Rita Hayworth in Cover Girl instead (1944). The irony is that Hayworth re-joined Frank Sinatra in the film when it was finally made over a decade later.

In 1941, MGM’s Arthur Freed bought out David O. Selznick’s personal contract with Kelly, which he signed when he came in town. He went straight to Hollywood after the success of his Broadway musical “Pal Joey” in 1940 on the big screen. After completing his one-picture contract with Selznick, he intended to return to New York City and the Broadway stage. Although Selznick placed his career on hold, he kept him off the screen when he came to Hollywood. Garland told Freed, the producer in charge of MGM’s musicals, that she wanted Kelly to be her collaborator in her next studio musical since she was aware of Kelly’s Broadway fame. MGM bought out Kelly’s contract after negotiations between Freed and Selznick, allowing him to star opposite Judy in For Me and My Gal (1942). After the success of the picture, Kelly’s cinematic career was resurrected.

Because of Catholicism’s backing for Francisco Franco during the Spanish Civil War and its apparent indifference to the great poverty he saw firsthand in Mexico during the late 1930s, he drifted away from the faith.

During a video interview in the late 1990s, Jules Dassin reminisced about the Cannes Film Festival in the 1950s, when he ran into Kelly, the only American he could be seen within public after he had been blacklisted in Hollywood. When asked about another American celebrity who hid beneath a table to avoid being seen with him, Dassin recalled (but could not identify) one in particular.

Gene Kelly and his friends loved to play volleyball on their concrete floors at home. His villa was never closed to guests; it was always available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In Patricia Ward Kelly’s estimation, her husband’s voracious reading habits made him capable of devouring a book in one sitting. He played an American concert pianist in the film “Demoiselles de Rochfort” and did his own dialogue in flawless French. In 1965, my daughter Bridget was born.

His first two wives were both professional dancers. When he first met Betsy Blair, he was working as a choreographer for the production “Diamond Horseshoe.” Before her marriage to Gene in 1960, Jeanne Coyne, Gene’s second wife, worked as his dancing assistant for a number of years before meeting him. She performs “From This Moment On” in Kiss Me Kate (1953), alongside Bobby Van, Ann Miller, Tommy Rall, Carol Haney, and Bob Fosse, demonstrating that she is a strong artist in her own right as well as a supporting player (1953). She died in 1973 as a result of leukemia.

A dancing vaudeville show that he and his younger brother Fred Kelly put on was a brother and sister combo of Fred Kelly and Kelly. Gene was eventually replaced by his brother Fred, who took “The Time of Your Life” on the road and won a Donaldson award for his portrayal as Harry the hoofer in the dramatic Broadway production of the play in 1939. Gene died in the same year as Fred. During the filming of Singin’ in the Rain’s renowned rain sequence, I had a fever of 103 degrees Fahrenheit (1952).

After seeing Kelly on Broadway in “Pal Joey,” producer David O. Selznick signed him to his first Hollywood contract. Gene picked Selznick over other studios because Selznick was the only one that didn’t need him to go through a screening process before signing him on the dotted line. Before Selznick could find Kelly a suitable role, he sold his contact to MGM for a substantial sum.

It was even before Kelly entered the film industry that he had a long-standing disagreement with MGM studio president Louis B. Mayer. Gene met Mayer backstage after seeing him perform in “Pal Joey” on Broadway, and Mayer immediately gave him a contract with MGM without requiring him to do a film test. When Kelly later received a phone call from an MGM representative requesting a screen test, he claimed there had been a clerical error, claiming he had Mayer’s assurance that he did not have to do one and instructing the representative to speak with Mayer directly. In a few days, he returned the phone call to tell that he had spoken with Mayer and that he was still required to take the test. Kelly wrote a scathing letter to Mayer when he failed to follow through on his commitment. The fact that Mayer had even read the letter was not revealed to Kelly until he brought it up during an argument one night.


Mr. Cyd Charisse’s husband, Tony Martin, asserted that he was aware of who she had been dancing with on an MGM set the previous day. The reason she might have bruises all over her body is that she worked with either Gene Kelly or Fred Astaire, both of whom are extremely demanding.

He played Don Hewes in the Easter Parade, a role that he was originally cast in alongside Judy Garland (1948). The filming was put on hold as a result of Fred Astaire’s decision to come out of retirement to take his position.

In the early 1970s, Bob Fosse considered him for the lead role in a film adaptation of the play “Chicago” by Maurine Dallas Watkins, which was being developed at the time. Much to Fosse’s delight, he eventually opted to pursue a career in stage musicals instead.

The line “he said look at poor Gene Kelly, I guess he won’t be singing in the rain” is heard during the song “Take Away My Pain” from Dream Theater’s album “Falling into Infinity,” which was released in 1997.

Columbia acquired the film rights to the popular musical “Best Foot Forward” as a result of MGM lending Kelly’s to the studio. In spite of the fact that it was generally assumed that Columbia would produce a film adaptation of Kelly’s stage hit “Pal Joey,” the studio chose to cast him alongside Rita Hayworth in the film Cover Girl instead (1944). The irony is that Hayworth reunited with Frank Sinatra in the film when it was finally released, more than a decade after the original release.

On Hello Dolly, he worked with choreographer Michael Kidd for one year on the film’s narrative, casting, and musical sequence concepts, and incorporated them into the production’s overall design, Involved himself in every aspect of the pre-production, then took leadership of the crew and incorporated it into the final product. Fred Astaire and I used to chastise the critics for not being able to classify ourselves as dancers because there was no precedent for what we were doing. They referred to us as tap dancers because it was the style that was popular in the United States at the time. But we weren’t really tap dancers at all.

Because we were required to be on-site at Hollywood studios like MGM all of the time, the contract structure allowed us to practice a great deal. However, it was also a very stifling environment. We were all indentured servants—you can call us slaves if you want—like baseball players before free agency since there were no union laws in place. We had seven-year contracts, but the studio had the power to sack you every six months if your film didn’t perform well. If you declined a job, your pay was lowered and the time was simply added to your contract.

Because they’ve studied the old film tapes, kids tell me they want to make musicals all over again. Nothing like it existed. Assuming we had made it, even on film, we assumed that it was gone. A peculiar belief in Hollywood is that musicals are less deserving of Academy consideration than more serious films like comedies. Is it an example of snobbism, the kind that maintains the assumption that dramas are better than comedies in the Academy Awards? It was the journalists who talked about two highly individual dancers as if they were one person that we had any hatred for. Fred, on the other hand, would have looked ridiculous in my blue jeans, hoodie, and sneakers ensemble. His attire was usually impeccable while mine was always worn. His steps were modest and graceful; Fred’s were athletic and ballet-oriented. The two of us were never adversaries. Prejudice that I met at college stayed with me for a long time because my family never used the word prejudice.

Because of the Great Depression, Kelly’s parents were unable to afford to send him to college in 1929. The global economic crisis that accompanied the Great Depression (1929–39) resulted in widespread unemployment and destitution. Kelly had to move back home and attend the University of Pittsburgh in order to save the cost of room and board. . A nearby dance school hired the mother of Kelly’s sister to work as a receptionist. She was the one who came up with the notion of the family owning a dancing studio. They did, and the studio was a resounding hit.

Kelly taught dance for six more years after he graduated from the University of Pittsburgh. He moved to New York City in 1937. His belief that he was capable of finding a job proved to be correct. His first week in New York, he landed a job in the theatre. A role in the Rodgers and Hart musical Pal Joey gave Kelly his big break.

Gene Kelly
Address, Phone Number, Email ID, Website
Phone NumberNA
House address (residence address)East Liberty, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Official WebsiteNA
Snapchat IdNA
Whatsapp No.NA
Instagram https://www.instagram.com/legendarygenekelly/?hl=en
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/public/Gene-Kelly
TwitchNA
Twitter https://twitter.com/GeneKellyLegacy?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor
TicTok IdNA
Email AddressNA
Office addressNA
Office NumberNA



Gene Kelly Address information: NA

Gene Kelly Official website: NA

Best Methods to Contact Gene Kelly:

It is simpler to contact Gene Kelly with the below-written contact ways. We have composed the authenticated and verified communications methods data as given below:

1. Gene Kelly TikTok:

Gene Kelly has a TikTok account with his own name. He uploads his videos on a regular basis. Follow Gene Kelly on TikTok to keep up with his newest updates and videos.

2. Gene Kelly Instagram Profile:

The most popular social media site is Instagram. On Instagram, you’ll find each person’s details as well renowned persons. You may also communicate with them via direct messaging if you use it. You may also use Instagram to view Gene Kelly Insta profile and his most recent photos.

3. Gene Kelly Facebook Profile:

The most well-known social media site is Facebook. Each and every renowned person’s bio may be found on Facebook. You may also reach out to them via direct messaging. Similarly, you may view Gene Kelly Facebook profile and updated photos by going to his page.

4. Gene Kelly Twitter Profile:

Using the popular social networking app Twitter, it is easier to locate and contact prominent people. You can tweet using his Twitter id so that he can see your tweet and respond with suitable responses.


5. Gene Kelly Phone Number, House Address, Email Id

Here we discuss the most common contact methods like the phone number of Gene Kelly, email address, and his fanmail address.

Gene Kelly phone number: NA
Gene Kelly email id: NA

Gene Kelly Fan mail address: NA

read also: Robson Green Phone Number, Email, Fan Mail, Address, Biography, Agent, Manager, Publicist, Contact Info

Team Author

Recent Posts

CouRageJD Phone Number, Email, Fan Mail, Address, Biography, Agent, Manager, Publicist, Contact Info

If you want to know about CouRageJD real phone number and also look for CouRageJD…

1 month ago

Harry Edward Melling Phone Number, Email, Fan Mail, Address, Biography, Agent, Manager, Publicist, Contact Info

If you want to know about Harry Edward Melling real phone number and also look…

1 month ago

Harry Jowsey Phone Number, Email, Fan Mail, Address, Biography, Agent, Manager, Publicist, Contact Info

If you want to know about Harry Jowsey real phone number and also look for…

1 month ago

Katie Sigmond Phone Number, Email, Fan Mail, Address, Biography, Agent, Manager, Publicist, Contact Info

If you want to know about Katie Sigmond real phone number and also looking for…

1 month ago

Charlotte Parkes Phone Number, Email, Fan Mail, Address, Biography, Agent, Manager, Publicist, Contact Info

If you want to know about Charlotte Parkes real phone number and also looking for…

1 month ago

Anastasia Kingsnorth Phone Number, Email, Fan Mail, Address, Biography, Agent, Manager, Publicist, Contact Info

If you want to know about Anastasia Kingsnorth real phone number and also looking for…

1 month ago