Actor

James Nesbitt Phone Number, Email, Fan Mail, Address, Biography, Agent, Manager, Publicist, Contact Info

If you want to know about James Nesbitt real phone number and also look for James Nesbitt email and fanmail address then, you are at the correct place! We are going to give you the contact information of James Nesbitt like his phone number, email address, and Fanmail address details.

James Nesbitt Contact Details:

REAL NAME: James Nesbitt
NICKNAME: James Nesbitt
DOB: 15 January 1965 (age 57 years), Ballymena, United Kingdom
BIRTHPLACE: Ballymena, United Kingdom
NATIONALITY: American
BIRTH SIGN: Capricorn
PROFESSION: Actor
FATHER: James Nesbitt
MOTHER: May Nesbitt
SIBLINGS: Kathryn Nesbitt, Margaret Nesbitt, Andrea Nesbitt
SPOUSE / WIFE: NA
CHILDREN: 2
INSTAGRAM HANDLE: https://www.instagram.com/jamesnesbitttv/?hl=en
TWITTER HANDLE: https://twitter.com/jnesbitttv?lang=en
FACEBOOK HANDLE: https://www.facebook.com/public/James-Nesbitt


James Nesbitt Bio

A well-known British actor, James Nesbitt was born on this date in 1965 and has had a long career in television. Most known for his roles in Cold Feet and Murphy’s Law, the award-winning actor is best renowned for his work. Capricorn is the zodiac sign of James Nesbitt, according to astrologers.

When William James Nesbitt was born on January 15th 1965, he was born in Ballymena, County Antrim. Lisnamurrican primary school headmaster James “Jim” Nesbitt was his father, while his mother, May Nesbitt, worked as a civil servant. Margaret, Kathryn, and Andrea, his three older sisters, are also teachers. Nesbitt was one of 32 students in his father’s one-room school, all of whom were the offspring of farmers. The family resided next door to the school.

“Completely” surrounded by ladies his entire life, he spent most of his time alone “kicking a ball against a wall”. To play for Manchester United or to become a teacher like his father, he had lofty goals. Protestant parents raised him in “Paisley country” in Lisnamurrican. Singing hymns around the piano was a Sunday night tradition for the entire family. Jim and Nesbitt were part of the Ballymena Young Conquerors flute band.


They ceased marching with the band after the Drumcree conflicts. While Nesbitt, his father, and one of his sisters nearly avoided being killed in a vehicle bomb explosion outside Ballymena County Hall in the early 1970s, the family was generally unscathed by the Troubles. Many people are curious about James Nesbitt’s ancestry, race, ethnicity, and country. Let’s have a look at this! Public resources, such as IMDb and Wikipedia, indicate that James Nesbitt’s ethnicity is Unknown. In this post, we’ll update James Nesbitt’s religious and political beliefs. Please come back to this post in a few days to see if anything has changed.

James Nesbitt Phone Number

According to Aileen Blaney’s review of the film in the History & Memory journal, the popularity of Nesbitt’s portrayal of Cooper was due to his real-life status as a household name. “A household name across Great Britain, Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic [sic], Nesbitt’s widespread popular appeal is emphatically not contingent upon his Protestant Ulster identity, and consequently the double-voicing of the character he plays does not alienate viewers of an alternative, or no, sectarian persuasion,” she reasoned. Bloody Sunday may have been an attempt to resolve his “Irishness” on the screen, according to Guardian journalist Susie Steiner.

“Where he has taken part in a sectarian theme, his brilliance as an actor has frequently been camouflaged by an overdone, cartoon-style humour,” she wrote. However, Nesbitt’s Irishness has been utilised for its romantic charm in his more successful and high-profile parts (particularly in Cold Feet and as Pig Finn in the sweetly pastoral picture Waking Ned). De-politicized in the process of being sugared.” Bloody Sunday was referred to as Nesbitt’s “coming of age” film by a critic, and Nesbitt himself saw it as a turning moment in his professional life. “Post-Bloody Sunday” is how he refers to his career since the film’s premiere. It was Nesbitt’s real-life household star status that made his portrayal of Cooper such a success, according to Aileen Blaney, who wrote an analysis of the film in the History and Memory journal.

According to her, the popularity of Nesbitt’s character is not based on his Protestant Ulster identity, and so the character’s dual voice does not alienate viewers of other or no sectarian beliefs, just as Cooper’s celebrity status in the 1970s was not based on his Protestant Ulster identity. “His brilliance as an actor has frequently been obscured by an exaggerated, cartoon-style comedy where he has taken part in a sectarian theme,” wrote Guardian journalist Susie Steiner in reference to his appearance in Bloody Sunday. However, Nesbitt’s Irishness has been utilised for its romantic charm in his more successful and high-profile parts (particularly in Cold Feet and as Pig Finn in the sweetly pastoral picture Waking Ned). De-politicized in the process of being sugared.” Bloody Sunday was referred to as Nesbitt’s “coming of age” film by a critic, and Nesbitt himself saw it as a turning moment in his professional life. “Post-Bloody Sunday” is how he refers to his career since the film’s premiere.

While attending a British Academy Television Awards celebration, Paul Greengrass approached Nesbitt about appearing in a television drama about the 1972 “Bloody Sunday” murders in Derry, Northern Ireland. At just seven years old, Nesbitt had no idea what had prompted the British Army to open fire, believing that “no smoke without fire” meant that the Catholic marchers must have done something to invite them. When he received the script, he was filming Cold Feet in Manchester. ”


An incredible impression” was felt by him after reading it. In Bloody Sunday, Nesbitt played the guy who pushed for the march to go ahead: Ivan Cooper. Nesbitt spent a lot of time talking to Cooper about his intentions on that day in order to prepare for the role. Don Mullan’s Eyewitness Bloody Sunday and Peter Pringle & Philip Jacobson’s Those Are Real Bullets? were among the books that he read with the relatives of the victims. Director Paul Greengrass likened his filmmaking process to that of an athlete training for a race. “For an Irish actor, playing the Troubles is like performing Lear,” he said. Nesbitt had doubts about his abilities as an actor and was concerned about how Derry Catholics would react to a Protestant playing the major role, despite the fact that Ivan Cooper is a Protestant himself.

It was Nesbitt’s real-life household star status that made his portrayal of Cooper such a success, according to Aileen Blaney, who wrote an analysis of the film in the History and Memory journal. According to her, the popularity of Nesbitt’s character is not based on his Protestant Ulster identity, and so the character’s dual voice does not alienate viewers of other or no sectarian beliefs, just as Cooper’s celebrity status in the 1970s was not based on his Protestant Ulster identity.

“His brilliance as an actor has frequently been obscured by an exaggerated, cartoon-style comedy where he has taken part in a sectarian theme,” wrote Guardian journalist Susie Steiner in reference to his appearance in Bloody Sunday. However, Nesbitt’s Irishness has been utilised for its romantic charm in his more successful and high-profile parts (particularly in Cold Feet and as Pig Finn in the sweetly pastoral picture Waking Ned). De-politicized in the process of being sugared.” Bloody Sunday was referred to as Nesbitt’s “coming of age” film by a critic, and Nesbitt himself saw it as a turning moment in his professional life. “Post-Bloody Sunday” is how he refers to his career since the film’s premiere.

While attending a British Academy Television Awards celebration, Paul Greengrass approached Nesbitt about appearing in a television drama about the 1972 “Bloody Sunday” murders in Derry, Northern Ireland. At just seven years old, Nesbitt had no idea what had prompted the British Army to open fire, believing that “no smoke without fire” meant that the Catholic marchers must have done something to incite them. When he received the script, he was filming Cold Feet in Manchester. “An incredible impression” was felt by him after reading it. In Bloody Sunday, Nesbitt played the guy who pushed for the march to go ahead: Ivan Cooper. Nesbitt spent a lot of time talking to Cooper about his intentions on that day in order to prepare for the role.


Don Mullan’s Eyewitness Bloody Sunday and Peter Pringle & Philip Jacobson’s Those Are Real Bullets? were among the books that he read with the relatives of the victims. Director Paul Greengrass likened his filmmaking process to that of an athlete training for a race. Nesbitt had doubts about his abilities as an actor and was concerned about how Derry Catholics would react to a Protestant playing the major role, despite the fact that Ivan Cooper is a Protestant himself. After moving to Coleraine, County Londonderry, where May worked for the Housing Executive, Nesbitt was just 11 years old. Before attending Coleraine Academical Institution, he attended Blagh Primary School for his primary schooling (CAI).

At the audition, Nesbitt performed “Bohemian Rhapsody” and earned the role of the Artful Dodger. Even after graduating from high school, he kept performing and singing with Riverside, appearing at fairs and on set of Play for Today: The Cry (1984). When the actor who was supposed to play Jiminy Cricket in Pinocchio fell and injured his ankle two days before the show, Nesbitt stepped in to fill in for him and received his Equity card. Initially, acting didn’t appeal to him, but after seeing The Winslow Boy, he “felt a light come on” (1948). In Portrush, he worked as a bingo caller for Barry’s Amusements when he was 15 years old. During the summer months, he was paid $1 per hour and worked as a brakeman on the dipper attraction.

Sonia Forbes-Adam, daughter of Reverend Sir Timothy Forbes Adam, was Nesbitt’s wife. Their romance began when Nesbitt saw Nesbitt play a call-back for Hamlet at Loughborough Hall in 1989. For a year following the release of Hear My Song, they broke up. They were reunited and wed in 1994. Peggy and Mary were the daughters of Bard the Bowman, and both appeared in the final two Hobbit films. After 19 years of marriage, Nesbitt revealed in October 2013 that he and his wife were separating. In 2016, they went through a divorce.

For seven years beginning in 1987, Nesbitt appeared in a wide range of plays, including the musical Up on the Roof (1987, 1989) and the political drama Paddywack (1994). He made his acting debut in the feature film Hear My Song as talent agent Fintan O’Donnell (1991). Cold Feet (1997–2003, 2016–present) was the vehicle for his breakout role as Adam Williams, for which he was nominated for three British Comedy Awards, one Television and Radio Industries Club Award, and one National Television Award.

When he was in his early twenties, he shared a house with fellow actor Jerome Flynn and worked signing fan mail for Soldier Soldier’s star. His first feature film role was Fintan O’Donnell, a struggling theatrical agent and friend of Mickey O’Neill’s in Peter Chelsom’s Hear My Song (in which he also appeared) (Adrian Dunbar). “The jaunty, bewildered Mr Nesbitt, manages to combine soulfulness with subtle humour,” observed a New York Times reviewer of the film. After receiving so much adulation, he became arrogant and self-assured, saying in 2001, “When I did Hear My Song, I disappeared so deep up my own arse afterwards. Oh, that’s it. I’ve figured it out.’ As a result, you learn just how disposable performers can be.”

He was out of employment for six months after the release of the picture because of his attitude. As a supporting actor on television shows such as Boon, The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, Covington Cross and Lovejoy until 1994 he juggled his theatrical performances with supporting appearances on television shows such as Between the Lines. in Love Lies Bleeding (1993), a BBC anthology series Screenplay and his first performance in a project directed by Michael Winterbottom, he appeared in Go Now (1995), Jude (1996) and Welcome to Sarajevo (2000). (1997). He was described by a Guardian journalist as a “generous supporting actor” in the films Jude and Sarajevo.

Back on the stage, he played Doalty in Translations (Gwenda Hughes, Birmingham Repertory Theatre, 1991) as well as Aidan and Damien in Paddywack (Michael Latimer), and Jesus in Darwin’s Flood (Mark Lambert and Nicholas Kent, Tricycle Theatre, 1992). (Simon Stokes, Bush Theatre, 1994). During its performance at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Connecticut in October 1994, Nesbitt’s character in Paddywack was accused by others of being an IRA member. “The only completely realised character” in the play, according to a Variety critic, was Damien, and “the one powerful, telling performance [of the cast]” was credited to Nesbitt. Leo McGarvey, the ex-boyfriend of Assumpta Fitzgerald (Dervla Kirwan) and love rival of Peter Clifford, appeared in an episode of Ballykissangel in 1996. (Stephen Tompkinson). The actor returned to the role for a total of four appearances in 1998.

He tried out for the role of Adam Williams in Cold Feet, an ITV Comedy Premiere about three couples at various phases of their love lives, in 1996. Nesbitt and the director, Declan Lowney, met through a mutual friend. Christine Langan, the film’s producer, also remembered his work on Hear My Song and Go Now. Mike Bullen, the English writer who wrote Adam, had not intended for an indigenous Irish actor to represent him, but Nesbitt wanted the opportunity to play an ordinary Northern Irishman in a modern drama, especially following the Troubles-based plot of Love Lies Bleeding. The first season of Cold Feet was a critical and commercial triumph, earning both the 1997 Golden Rose of Montreux and the 1997 British Comedy Award for Best ITV Comedy. The first season of Cold Feet premiered at the end of 1998, while the second season premiered in 1999. Adam was diagnosed with testicular cancer in that series, which prompted Nesbitt to become a patron of Action Cancer.

His parents, May, a civil servant, and James Nesbitt, a school principal, raised him in Ballymena, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, where he grew up. He was educated at Coleraine College of Education (also the school of Brian Campbell & Brian McAlister). In the beginning, he envisioned himself as a French instructor. After his teacher Robert Simpson urged him to seek an apprenticeship at the Riverside Theatre, his interest in acting began, leading him to a theatre school in London and finally to a successful performing career in the industry.

Some media anticipated that he will join the cast of Doctor Who after appearing in Steven Moffat’s Jekyll (2007). (2005). British television magazine interviewed Nesbitt in 2008, and he dismissed the allegations, saying that he couldn’t follow Christopher Eccleston and David Tennant and that he thought his age of 43 made him ineligible for the position.

When it comes to conflict and politics, Northern Ireland is a perfect example. Once upon a time, it was inconceivable to lay down your weapons and pursue a political route. It demonstrates exactly how far you can go.

Even though I was broke in high school, many of my friends had jobs and were kind with their money, so taking them to a soccer match in Europe means I can give something back to them. I’m feeling frail and old. Back in the beginning of my career, I thought I was a man when I was just a dewy-eyed boy who had never seen an avocado or eaten a tomato.


I started thinning hair a few years back and, like many other men, I was terrified. It was almost an obsession. As an actor, I’m constantly in the public eye, and I was worried that my hair loss might influence the success of my work.

“Babylon” (2014 release) It was as though we were filming for a feature film. Much of the camerawork is extraordinarily accurate. Even though there are some incredibly funny characters in the show, I believe that the overall tone is lighthearted due to the interactions between all of the cops. It wasn’t just for fun; we were all serious about it.

James Nesbitt Address, Phone Number, Email ID, Website
Phone Number+44 (0)20-7436 6400
House address (residence address)Ballymena, United Kingdom
Official WebsiteNA
Snapchat IdNA
Whatsapp No.NA
Instagram https://www.instagram.com/jamesnesbitttv/?hl=en
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/public/James-Nesbitt
TwitchNA
Twitter https://twitter.com/jnesbitttv?lang=en
TicTok IdNA
Email AddressNA
Office addressNA
Office NumberNA

James Nesbitt Address information:

James Nesbitt
ARG
4A Exmoor Street
London W10 6BD
UK

James Nesbitt Official website: http://www.argtalent.com/

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James Nesbitt phone number: +44 (0)20-7436 6400
James Nesbitt email id: NA


James Nesbitt Fan mail address:

James Nesbitt
ARG
4A Exmoor Street
London W10 6BD
UK

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